Section 7 Deer Management Agreement

17 The particular challenges posed by the control of the number of wild game in peri-urban areas underline that an essential strategic condition for effective deer control in these areas is to ensure adequate slaughter in adjacent areas of the landscape. In some areas, this will involve targeting red deer and deer to limit the movement of these large species to peri-urban areas. [14] Generally speaking, however, there is a need to manage kidney density at a level that limits the continued spread of deer in the peri-urban area each year due to under-slaughter in adjacent areas. 8 The concern raised by that situation led to `the need to manage the deer population in urban and peri-urban areas` being added to the list of factors in Article 1(2) of the 1996 Act by the WANE (S) Act 2011. These are factors that SNH must take into account in certain circumstances, to the extent that the legislation so provides. The challenges of controlling the number of deer in these environments compared to the wider landscape are discussed below. 18 The Laws of 1959 and 1996 have always held that it was in the public interest for particular interests in land use to be represented in s.1 through the public authorities and their tasks. Over the next 60 years in 1959, both the types of interests represented in section 1 and the way they are represented in the section have changed as the interpretation of public interests has evolved. 37 The Group believes, however, that greater attention should be paid to the management of deer in urban areas. The magnitude of the current problems in these regions could be seen as limited compared to the problems of rural areas, but the more direct social concerns contribute to the importance of the problems. 21 There can be no model of local deer hunters working in a peri-urban area. However, the group believes that the SNH, as the deer authority, should have a sufficiently clear overview of the current management of cervids in each area in order to address the issues related to the negative effects of deer. While this could be to limit DVCs or damage caused by cervids to land use interests, one of the important objectives should be to manage deer densities at a level limiting the spread of deer in adjacent urban areas.

4 examples of the use of „effective deer management” have been cited in the introduction to this report. . . .